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Talking Points

Remind them that print sells. For example, a wine label with wide appeal (i.e. a well-designed print piece) can make a good wine more desirable and a bad wine more salable.

Explain why the use of "tree-free" paper does not protect forests for the long term.

Discuss the reasons why 9 out of 10 graphic designers work in print as part of their mix and roughly 3 in 4 projects involve a print component.

Point out that new print magazines, such as Smithsonian Journeys, are still being launched.

cartoon

This spread was designed by Ian Findlay and appeared in the Spring 2014 Issue of the Print Power Magazine, pp. 40-41. To read the magazine, click here. Photo courtesy of Print Power Europe.

The first book that can be planted after it is read.


NEW STUDY SHOWS THAT U.S. CONSUMERS PREFER READING FROM PAPER

A new survey1 into the preferences of consumers for printed versus digital communications has been published by Two Sides, the global organization created to promote the responsible production, use and sustainability of print and paper.

Over 1,000 U.S. consumers were surveyed, and 88% of respondents indicated that they understood, retained or used information better when they read print on paper compared to lower percentages (64% and less) when reading on electronic devices. The same trend was found for reading complicated documents, with 80% indicating a clear preference for reading print on paper, and reading on screens being preferred by less than 16% of respondents across all age groups.

The survey also revealed that 81% found printed media more relaxing to read, while 62% of mobile/smartphone users (rising to 73% among 18 to 24 year olds) were concerned about how these devices were damaging their health (i.e. causing eye strain, headaches, insomnia). Overall, the survey reported that 81% of respondents preferred to read print on paper when given the choice.

"While on-screen reading occupies an increasing amount of consumer time," explains Phil Riebel, President of Two Sides North America, "people's preferences are still for reading print on paper, which they believe to be more informative, less distracting and less harmful to their health."

Although acceptance of digital media is generally stronger among younger age groups, there is also a strong preference for print on paper existing across all ages.

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Talking Points

There's something about print on paper that people just can't ignore.

Opening a nice envelope is a surprisingly exciting experience.

Over 63% of printed paper in the U.S. is recycled, recovered and reused.

cartoon

This spread was designed by Ian Findlay and appeared in the Spring 2014 Issue of the Print Power Magazine, pp. 40-41. To read the magazine, click here. Photo courtesy of Print Power Europe.

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Ad in May/Jun 2015 issue of Graphic Design USA GDUSA ad

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